The 25 most important academic books of 2013, plus a few of my own choices

Stuart Elden has posted his top 25 academic books published in 2013. Its a really helpful reading list for those interested in politics and theory. I notice that Louise Amoore’s The Politics of Possibility is included in the list. I’ve just received a copy of this and will probably post about it soon. I’ve used Louise’s work a great deal over the last 3 or 4 years. This book looks like another important intervention.

My own favourite academic book of the year was Fred Inglis’ Richard Hoggart: Virtue and Reward (which I posted a review of here). It’s a really helpful read for contextualising work on culture. I also enjoyed Henry Schermer and David Jary’s Form and Dialectic in Georg Simmel’s Sociology (which I reviewed for Berfrois). Another important book in 2013 was James Allen-Robertson’s Digital Culture Industry. In terms of textbooks I enjoyed reading and writing a review (for Antipode) of Matthew Sparke’s Introducing Globalization: Ties, Tension and Uneven Integration.

Three other books published this year that I’ve got on my reading pile for my next project are Philip Mirowski’s Never Let a Serious Crisis go to waste , Greg Hainge’s Noise Matters and Lev Manovich’s Software Takes Command.

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2 Responses to The 25 most important academic books of 2013, plus a few of my own choices

  1. stuartelden says:

    Interesting suggestions, though you make Mirowski’s sound like a diet book…

    • Thanks Stuart…I’ve put it right. Although my alternative title seems to work very well. And having seen the book sales figures in the guardian, diet books are probably the way to go.

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